Background

In Myanmar, injuries are the leading cause of death and the leading cause of hospitalisation. A clear opportunity exists to support the local trauma care stakeholders in their efforts to achieve a sustainable reduction in preventable deaths and disability from severe injury.

 

Key Objectives & Outcomes

The aim of the program is to increase the capacity of emergency and trauma doctors and nurses in Myanmar to deliver life-saving care. The primary intended outcome is improved knowledge and skills in trauma reception and resuscitation by the emergency and trauma doctors in Myanmar.

The program activities for 2015 to 2017 are based on the delivery of trauma care team training to Myanmar clinicians in Myanmar, Thailand and Australia. The Alfred will deliver the Trauma Team Training (TTT) program at Yangon General Hospital each year for 3 years. This will be conducted over 3 weeks annually, with a faculty of 4 doctors and 4 nurses (all trauma specialists). More than 72 doctors and nurses will be trained. The Alfred will also deliver the Masterclass in Advanced Surgical Techniques in Trauma (MASTT) program. In the first year, the faculty of 4 surgeons and 2 operating theatre nurses will visit Yangon General Hospital and work alongside local staff. In both years 2 and 3, the faculty will collaborate with Thai surgeons to deliver the one week masterclass using the cadaver lab at Chiang Mai University, Thailand. There will be 6 Alfred faculty and 12 Myanmar participants per course. Finally, 6 trauma care champions identified as future instructors will complete a train-the-trainer program during the programs in Yangon and Chiang Mai and a two week visit to the Alfred Hospital each year for 3 years.


Main Partner Orgnaisations(s): Yangon General Hospital, Myanmar

Geographic Location(s): Myanmar and Thailand

Chief Investigator(s): Professor Mark Fitzgerald ASM

Project Manager / Officer(s): Dr Gerard O’Reilly, Ms Ellaine Boo

Main Contact: Dr Gerard O’Reilly

Year Commenced: 2013

Expected Completion: Ongoing

Research Funding Body:Australian Government – Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (GPFD)